ISSN 01370936
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Russian Psychological Society
The Faculty of Psychology. Lomonosov Moscow State University.
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Agris, Anastasiya R.

Post graduate student at Lomonosov Moscow State University
Moscow, Russia

Publications

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Agris A.R., Akhutina T.V., Korneev A.A.(2014). Varieties of Unit I functions deficits in children with the risk of learning disabilities (the end). The Moscow University Herald.Series 14.Psychology,4,44-55

a:2:{s:4:"TEXT";s:1665:"<p>The paper presents results of the neuropsychological assessment of processes
involved in the maintenance of activation (Luria’s Unit I functions) in 64 firstgraders
who demonstrated various levels of academic success. On the basis of
this assessment, the children were divided into three groups: (i) the children
without any deficit in the Unit I functions (CONTROL children), (ii) those
predominantly showing slowness/fatigue (SLOW children), and (iii) those who
can be considered as predominantly hyperactive-impulsive (HYPERACTIVE
children). It is shown that, relative to controls, both SLOW and HYPERACTIVE
children show reduced academic scores and the decrease of most indices that
characterize functions of the Units II and III. The weaknesses of executive and
visual-spatial functions are predominantly observed in HYPERACTIVE children,
whereas SLOW children usually show some deficit in processing of kinesthetic
(proprioceptive) and audio-verbal information. Children with functional
weakness of the Unit I functions show an overall reduction in performance and its
speed in the computerized versions of the “DOTS” and “SCHULTE—GORBOV
tables” tests. In HYPERACTIVE children, deficits are observed in the most
difficult tasks (those probing mostly into planning and control functions), and
their performance is the most unstable. In SLOW children, the performance
rate is noticeably decreased for the moderate-to-difficult tasks. Overall, the data
reported contribute to the understanding of the diversity of Unit I functions
deficits and their relation to the learning difficulties experienced by children in
the primary school.</p>";s:4:"TYPE";s:4:"html";}

Received: 02/05/2014

Pages: 44-55

Available Online: 12/31/2014

Agris A.R., Akhutina T.V., Korneev A.A.(2014).Varieties of Unit I functions deficits in children with the risk of learning disabilities . The Moscow University Herald.Series 14.Psychology,3,34-46

a:2:{s:4:"TEXT";s:1662:"<p>The paper presents results of the neuropsychological assessment of processes
involved in the maintenance of activation (Luria’s Unit I functions) in 64 firstgraders
who demonstrated various levels of academic success. On the basis of
this assessment, the children were divided into three groups: (i) the children
without any deficit in the Unit I functions (CONTROL children), (ii) those
predominantly showing slowness/fatigue (SLOW children), and (iii) those who
can be considered as predominantly hyperactive-impulsive (HYPERACTIVE
children). It is shown that, relative to controls, both SLOW and HYPERACTIVE
children show reduced academic scores and the decrease of most indices that
characterize functions of the Units II and III. The weakness of executive and
visuo-spatial functions are predominantly observed in HYPERACTIVE children,
whereas SLOW children usually show some deficit in processing of kinesthetic
(proprioceptive) and audio-verbal information. Children with functional
weakness of the Unit I functions show an overall reduction in performance and its
speed in the computerized versions of the “DOTS” and “SCHULTE—GORBOV
tables” tests. In HYPERACTIVE children, deficits are observed in the most
difficult tasks (those probing mostly into planning and control functions), and
their performance is the most unstable. In SLOW children, the performance
rate is noticeably decreased for the moderate-to-difficult tasks. Overall, the data
reported contribute to the understanding of the diversity of Unit I functions
deficits and their relation to the learning difficulties experienced by children in
the primary school.</p>";s:4:"TYPE";s:4:"html";}

Received: 02/05/2014

Pages: 34-46

Available Online: 09/30/2014


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